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Proficiency Stalls

This lesson should establish the student’s familiarity with situations leading to (and the execution of) stalls, while explaining the danger of near-spin conditions.

Elements

  • what is a stall?
    • factors affecting stalls
  • when can they happen?
    • types of stalls

Equipment

  • model aircraft
  • whiteboard and markers
  • Airplane Flying Handbook
  • standardization manual (Arrow)

Instructor actions

Demonstrate, using the whiteboard and model aircraft, the setups, execution, and recoveries for proficiency stalls. As a guided discussion, teach and evaluate the student’s application of the maneuvers to real-world situations.

Student actions

Read assignment prior to briefing, and participate in the guided discussion with responses and questions.

Completion Standards

The lesson will be complete when the student shows a working knowledge of proficiency stalls and can explain the maneuvers with minimal instructor guidance.

Plan of Action

Power-on stall

  • MRA of 1,500 ft dual, 2,000 ft solo
  • throttle to 15”
  • flaps, gear as specified (takeoff or climb)
  • pitch for VR
  • apply full power
    • consideration of turning tendencies, especially torque and p-factor
  • reduce airspeed (+10/–0 knots) to just above stall
  • pitch attitude required
  • level climb or climbing turn as specified
  • coordination – importance at slow speed
  • recovery (power, flaps, gear)
  • Vx or Vy prior to flap retraction
  • arrest descent, avoiding secondary
  • reaction speeds

Power-off stall

  • MRA of 1,500 ft dual, 2,000 ft solo
  • throttle to 15”
  • flaps, gear as specified
  • pitch for approach speed
    • configure for a stabilized descent
  • heading or bank
  • pitch for an excessively high landing attitude
  • coordination during the stall
  • recovery (power, flaps, gear)
  • Vx or Vy prior to flap retraction
  • arrest descent, avoiding secondary
  • reaction speeds